Onboarding

new hire orientation

A New Hire Is Only as Good as Your Orientation

Blog | Author: Amy Bybee | Source: HCI | Published: July 15, 2016

A new employee’s first days on the job are crucial! They come into new hire orientation looking to affirm that they made the right decision joining the company. And whether their orientation experience is good or bad, that doesn’t stop them from moving on into their role – ready or not, here they come!

Article

The Secret Cash Burner in Your Training Plan

Article | Source: Bridge | Published: July 13, 2016

As long as there have been employees, there have been employee training programs. Before the printing press made it practical to mass produce copies of Ye Olde Employee Handbook (or fliers announcing the company BBQ and jousting contest) ...

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practical knowledge

Why Practical Knowledge Beats the Training Manual

Blog | Author: Bloomfire | Source: HCI | Published: June 30, 2016
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You know that the time and resources your company sinks into training new hires each year is costing you, but have you ever really calculated how much? Almost all onboarding and training programs are focused solely on giving participants basic information about their job and the company, which in most cases amounts to only a small portion of the information new employees need to be effective. Obviously, employees that aren’t effective in their role are costing you money.

Article

5 Tips to Up Your Customer Service Training

Article | Source: Bridge | Published: June 9, 2016

Any company can say they have superior customer service, but how many really do? Excellent customer service is not something that can be achieved overnight. Instead, it’s often the result of high-quality training and a company ...

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Article

3 Tips to Makeover Boring Training

Article | Source: Bridge | Published: June 3, 2016

Compliance training is one of those necessary evils of the modern workplace. Images come to mind of thick OSHA binders full of loose paper, footnotes and details no one can stop yawning long enough to read, much less remember. And it goes both ...

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