Change Management

Drive change through people with the right communication and approaches

Because change is constant, organizations need to drive change through people rather than driving people through change. With the right communication and approaches, your employees can withstand drastic or even small organizational changes without a negative impact on business results. Learn about the need for and process of finding “change architects” to facilitate the organization’s movement through a change initiative, using “broadcasters” to communicate the change with stories and data, and having “coaches” to address the personal resistances of change. Accountability and ownership for change are diffused throughout the organization.

Learn More about Change Management with our Top Resources

Keynote VideoKeynote Video

Dream. Disrupt. Repeat.

April 5, 2016 | Anna Reed

How can a recognition program make your organization more innovative? In this HCI Keynote video, Anna Reed, who focuses on Recognition and Rewards at Capital One, describes how this leading banking organization revamped a stagnant ...

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Defining Employee Engagement and Initiating Change

March 31, 2016 | Anna Burke | HCI

Employee engagement is talked about often but rarely clearly defined.  Learn about the meaning of employee engagement, what the data shows and steps to take to help improve it, as well as how companies are approaching the employee engagement challenge.

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Talent Pulse 3.1 - HR's Role in Change Management

March 23, 2016 | Jenna Filipkowski | Human Capital Institute

Continuous change is the reality in our fast-paced world. Oftentimes, we find ourselves having change fatigue when everything is in a constant state of flux. In addition, it is difficult to gain support for change initiatives and most of them ...

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Essential Tips for Navigating Fundamental Corporate Change

March 4, 2016 | Karima Mariama-Arthur, Esq. | HCI

As major corporate transactions go — the larger and more complex the undertaking, the thornier it can be to navigate. If you've ever been on the front lines (or thick in the weeds, for that matter) of a merger, acquisition, divestiture, dissolution, liquidation or similar pursuit, you're probably all too familiar with the labyrinthine process.